The Tao of Boat Repair

So, the boat engine is finally done, after a year of mucking around with it, although most of that time was NOT working on it.  Life got in the way and weekends became too busy.  I will admit that there is little of anything that I do once the football season starts.  Lazy? Perhaps.  Oh, but it makes Saturdays busy with getting Honeydew list items done.  Anyway, so the boat was a steal, finding out that the man who sold the boat lied about all of the work needed on it.  So, part by part, the engine was rebuilt, culminating in a complete overhaul, minus cylinder sleeves and pistons.  They were in great shape.  Everything else? Not so much.  All because of one simple failure of a check valve that prevents water from backing up into the exhaust manifold.  Now, you may not know that most boats have a standard cooling system (at least, back in 2000 and earlier) because it is less maintenance when taken care of.  Closed cooling systems require more plumbing on the motor and it is maintenance heavy, but it provides heat during colder temperatures so you can sit in relative comfort, if you are boating during the fall months in places that get cold.  Florida gets chilly, but a jacket and long pants suffice to keep you warm.

Okay, so the boat is ready to return to the water, but I need a new battery, so I’m going to just get one and prevent a dead boat out on the water.  Since it is the first time since I replaced the major parts of the boat, I’m taking it out alone with the tools and whatever else I may  need to get the boat going again.  If all else fails, Progressive will cover our sea-tow to the slip where I can humbly put the boat back on the trailer and go home with my tail between my legs and a brainstorm of things to do to fix the boat.

Pics of the boat on the water soon! I hope! Haha!  You know the two happiest days of a boater’s ownership of his boat?  The day he buys it and the day he sells it.  Let’s hope this isn’t one of those cases.

~ by kyodan75 on October 29, 2011.

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